Over 20,000 Japanese Women Sign #KuToo Petition To Ban Compulsory High Heels At Work

Image Credits: Japan Times

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Elegant, fashionable and appropriately formal – that is how high heels are advertised to working women. For most, it has become an integral element of their corporate jobs as their office dress codes mandate them to appear in high heel pumps and work around in those throughout the day.

Though high heels might reign in the style charts, almost all women across the world will unanimously agree that the shoes are extremely inconvenient, uncomfortable and painful if worn for prolonged hours. Doctors also recommend avoiding high heels as much as possible since it may lead to sprains, lower back pain, sore feet, nervous disorders and even crooked feet.

No one has ever become poor by giving
– Anne Frank

The scenario is perhaps the worst in Japan, where almost all working women are instructed to wear high heels, irrespective of their job profile. Even though some firms do not have explicit mandates for the same, many women still wear heels to work to cater to social & professional expectations. However, nearly 20,000 Japanese women have recently signed an online petition titled #KuToo seeking a government ban on “requiring female employees to wear high heels on the job,” stated Reuters.

The campaign was started by Yumi Ishikawa

The campaign was launched by 32-year-old Yumi Ishikawa whose part-time job at a funeral parlour compelled her to wear high-heels. In Japanese, ‘Kutsu’ refers to shoes, and ‘Kutsuu’ means pain. The campaign name – #KuToo – blends both the words in alignment with the globally popular #MeToo campaign by women.

Ishikawa coined the hashtag while voicing her grievances in a tweet which soon went viral and were acknowledged by thousands of women in the country. Soon, it assumed the stature of a substantial campaign and a petition was launched which garnered 20,000+ signatories within a short time.

She mentioned in her petition appeal how high heels are responsible for feet disorders like bunions, blisters and even pain in the lower back. “It’s hard to move, you can’t run and your feet hurt. All because of manners,” she wrote in the petition. Ishikawa also revealed that almost all women inevitably change to comfortable shoes like sneakers or flats after work hours. She also alleged that the norms are lopsided since men are not mandated to any such painful dress diktats.

Japan health minister defends high heels as “necessary & appropriate”

Ishikawa has designated her campaign as a fight against gender discrimination. It is mention-worthy here despite unprecedented economic progress as a nation, Japan fares quite low in the gender-equality index of World Economic Forum. It has a deplorable rank of 110 among 149 countries.

The initial response from Japan’s Health and Labour minister Takumi Nemoto has delved quite an unexpected blow to the hopeful signatories, as he defended the norm of wearing high heels as “necessary and appropriate”, reported The Guardian. On June 5, Wednesday, while addressing the issue before a legislative committee, Nemoto said, “It is socially accepted as something that falls within the realm of being occupationally necessary and appropriate.”

Previous protests – at Cannes & the UK

Incidentally, Japanese women are not the pioneers of the movement against high heels. In 2015, controversy brewed up at the popular Cannes Film Festival as women celebrities without high heels were denied access to the red carpet. Despite protests from Hollywood A-listers like Julia Roberts, Cannes has continued to maintain the inconvenient dress code.

In 2016, British woman Nicola Thorp launched a similar petition after her workplace refused her entry for denying to wear high heels. Though a parliamentary investigation was conducted on gender-discriminatory dress codes at workplaces, the British government rejected the bill which prohibited companies from demanding women to wear high heels to work.

Efforts For Good take

There was a time in the past when Japanese businessmen were compulsorily expected to wear neckties to the workplace. But, the government did away with the awkward norm in 2005, as a part of their ‘cool biz’ campaign to provide a comfortable dress code to male employees. However, the scenario for women regarding high heels has not changed, though high heels are medically way more harmful and uncomfortable than neckties.

Many of the petitioners are comparing the norm for high heels with the brutal medieval practice of foot-binding, or even the French norm of wearing crushing corsets to maintain a slender physique.

Efforts For Good hopes corporate firms across the world take cognisance of the grievances of their women employees and mustn’t overwhelm them with unnatural dress codes that can take a toll on their health.

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Who’s A Good Boy? Visually-Challenged People From USA Are Adopting Guide Dogs Who Make Life Heckin Easier

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Twenty years ago, at the prime of her youth, Jill Anderson was diagnosed with Retinitis Pigmentosa, an eye disease that can ultimately rob one of their eyesight. There is no cure. Slowly, Jill’s world was getting darker and darker. “I began to realise I couldn’t escape the inevitable,” she shares.

Jill grew helpless, more so because her everyday tasks were becoming impossible day by day. She would hit walls and injure herself trying to walk alone inside her own house. Dimly lit places would be a nightmare for her, so was meeting with acquaintances, as she failed to see and recognise their faces. She was gradually slipping into despair until Kirby came along.

No one has ever become poor by giving
– Anne Frank

Kirby is one among many guide dogs of America, who are specially trained to assist visually-impaired individuals in their everyday life. Jill and Kirby are now inseparable, fondly nicknamed as Team Jirby.Guide Dogs of America

Who are the guide dogs of America?

Over 70 years ago, Joseph Jones Sr. founded the association ‘Guide Dogs of America’ with an aim to aid visually-challenged persons with trained feline companions. Joseph himself lost his eyesight at 57 years of age. A dedicated dog-lover, Joseph was keen to get a dog for himself, but almost all the dog-training institutes rejected him outright for his ‘advanced age’. Joseph was determined, and out of his sheer zeal was born International Guiding Eyes in 1948, one of the first guide dog schools in the USA. And Joseph got his own guide dog Lucy, who stayed by his side till last breath.

Guide Dogs of America
Joseph with his guide dog Lucy

Later, in 1992, the organisation changed its name to Guide Dogs of America.

Presently, Guide Dogs of America (GDA) has their schools in USA and Canada, where puppies are trained to be a blind person’s best friend, and later handed over to a caring owner, completely free of charge.

How are these ‘good boys’ trained

The process of training at GDA is highly systematic and full-proof, and needless to say, heartwarming indeed. Hundreds of stories with the happiest endings have sprouted from the training workshops of GDA. Perhaps the best part about adopting a guide dog from GDA is that the potential owners are matched with the perfect dog for them, following a three-week-long training session involving both the willing adopters and the dogs.

At around eight weeks of age, the young puppies are taken home by GDA’s volunteer puppy raisers, where they are brought up to be ‘good boys’. The puppy raisers also expose them to a wide range of environments so that they can adapt easily anywhere in future. At eighteen months, the loving, laughing, spirited young dogs are brought back to the GDA centre, where formal guide dog instructors devote time to each and every dog, teaching them advanced commands. Ranging from overcoming diverse hurdles to identify life-threatening situations for a blind person, these dogs are trained in everything.

Meanwhile, the performance, behavioural pattern and energy levels of each dog are meticulously monitored and recorded, so that when the owners arrive, they are paired up with a pup best suited for them.

When the registered blind persons arrive at the GDA camp, they are teamed up with the dog which suits their personality best. Then they are asked to engage in immersive training with their respective guide dogs, to master the dos and don’ts for living together. In the end, the dogs are officially graduated and go to their forever homes.

How Derek, the blind surfer, found his Serenity

There is probably not a single professional surfer who doesn’t recognise Derek Rabelo, the visually-impaired surfer. His inspiring story has been the subject of books and world-famous documentaries. While years of practice and passionate practice have made riding the waves a cakewalk for him, Derek would still struggle to walk on the streets or reach the beach every day on his own. This was until Derek’s wife Madeline surprised him with a proposal, to adopt a guide dog from GDA. Serenity, a yellow labrador who was paired to be Derek’s guide dog, is equally dynamic in spirit.

Guide Dogs of America

“Serenity knows I want to go there when we go back. She gives me much more freedom and mobility to go where I want to go. She gives me a lot of confidence, and I trust her. Our relationship is growing every day,” Derek cannot hide his excitement about adopting Serenity, as he shared in the GDA blog, abuzz with more such heartwarming stories.

Blind dogs are getting their own guide dogs

Recently, visually-challenged New York resident Thomas Panek became the world’s first blind man to finish a half-marathon. However, Waffle, Westley and Gus, his super-efficient guide dogs, deserve 50% of the credit for his victory, as the trio of Labrador Retrievers helped him cover the 21 km race.

Guide dogs are perhaps not only for humans, as proved by blind Dachshund Dozer and guide dog OZ, a pit bull. Same is the story of 11-year-old Charlie from South Carolina, a Golden Retriever who lost his eyes to glaucoma. That’s when Maverick came in, a trained pup which soon became Charlie’s best friend and sole companion.

Efforts For Good take

Keeping a service dog is quite different from adopting a normal pet dog, owing to the long list of regulations to be stringently followed. Still, in the USA, the number of service dogs are growing rapidly. People with visual impairment, physical disabilities, epilepsy and Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) generally opt for service dogs to be their unfailing companion through thick and thin. Guide dogs of America belong to the first of the categories mentioned above, and their numbers are also on a steady increase.

GDA is completely financed from public donations and fundraising, where people contribute generously for giving these guide dogs the best training facilities.

While technology is dedicated to making life easier for the visually-challenged, guide dogs are resolved to provide them with wholesome companionship and being a 24×7 friend.

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Quote
It's not how much we give
but how much love we put into giving.
- Mother Theresa Quote
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